Korean Traditional Fan Making Short Class at Korean Cultural Center Indonesia

Written by on July 17, 2012 in Arts, Lifestyle, Worldwide Korea Bloggers

* This post is written by Maria Margareta, one of the Korea Blog’s Worldwide Korea Bloggers.

Dano refers to the fifth day of the fifth lunar month and it is one of the representative traditional festive days in the early summer.

The particular custom for Dano is to wash one’s hair with the juice of iris leaves and also not only wash but also including drink the iris leaves juice to remove headaches for women.

Dano which was taught to be a day of great vitality when all things in nature were alive; therefore it was believed to be the best day to expel misfortune. Thus all people from commoners to the Royal Palace used to put amulets on the gateposts of their houses, In the amulets a magic formula was written to ensure a happy, prosperous life and to keep out ghosts and deceases, or various divine were painted in red, including Cheoyong, the god who defeats evil spirits and ghosts.

There two folk games usually held on Dano, women games is Geunettwigi(그네뛰기) and Ssireum(씨름) is a wrestling games for men.
Geunettwigi is a swing games, played by women by standing on the swing seat. The swing was usually hung from a high branch of tall tree, allowing a total swing length of four meters or more.
씨름 Ssireum is one of the oldest martial arts in Korea. Based on the wall paintings on royal tombs from Goguryeo Kingdom, ssireum had captured around year 37 BC.
Also in Dano festival, there is a tradition by giving a fan each other. The ornaments could be animal objects such as tiger or dragon as a symbol of lucky and defeats evil spirits. Or could be a peony flower ornaments which are using for an ornament of Korean wedding dress. Peony flower is a symbol of  prosperity.

Painting or making of Moran (peony flower) fan is dedicated that the painter would get delighted live and prosperity.

This is what I’m going to share, my great experience on this weekend of how to make a Korean traditional fan, Moran fan. This activities is a short course held at Korean Cultural Center Indonesia and collaboration with the National Folk Museum of Korea.

My tutor name is Jungye Nam (www.namjungye.com) and I got a lot of knowledge from her of how to paint a Korean fan. Especially the way of making a gradation color in water color painting. I was so excited to follow this class today.

Korean Traditional Fan Making Short Class

Part I
All of the tools for this course are brought from Korea and made in Korea. Korean fan is made from Hanji (Korean paper) with maedeup ornament (Korean knot hand craft) as an accessories, brush and also various colors of water color paint.

Part II
Ms. Nam gives some instructions and useful tips of how to paint a fan using Korean technique. We are also helped by her team. From this course I got a new lesson how to make a gradation by using water color paint.

Part III

Activities of participants during the class.
How to make a gradation :
1. Put a darker color on the section you want to make a gradation. Make a round shape. Do it fast and let the water color paint still wet on the fan.
2. Put the brush on the water then put it on a tissue, and brush the wet part of a darker side with up moving.

Part IV

How to make a gradation :
1. Put a darker color on the section you want to make a gradation. Make a round shape. Do it fast and let the water color paint still wet on the fan.
2. Put the brush on the water then put it on a tissue, and brush the wet part of a darker side with up moving.
Fisnishing steps :
You may add another ornaments or coloring another part of a fan with you own creation.
and … here is a fan, I made ^^

Besides a class I followed, there is another class with the topic making of Korean mask, it is also held together with this program.

Thank you for Korean Cultural Center Indonesia for held this program. We are looking forward for the next program related with traditional Korean art and culture in the future.

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